Monthly Archives: February 2015


In slavery matters, numbers are still relevant

Numbers are not everything, but in the case of the Atlantic slave trade they reveal the importance of the institution of slavery and the size of populations of African descent in the Atlantic world. I am surprised to see how recently published academic books still ignore the findings of the Transatlantic Slave Trade Database. The database […]


Finally in Brazil: Heritage Trails of the Atlantic Slave Trade

Historians Hebe Mattos and Martha Abreu published an excellent article on their weblog (it is in Portuguese and featured on this website in the menu Digital initiatives) about the new heritage trail of Valongo Wharf, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Hebe and Martha as many of you know are pioneers (along with the late Ana Lugão Rios) in […]


A New “Slavery” Museum in the United States ?

In a famous interview of 1989, Nobel Prize winner Toni Morrison pointed out that her book Beloved (1987) was a site of memory of slavery as sites of the slave trade like New York City and Charleston were not at all highlighted in the landscape of the United States. Since 1989, this situation dramatically changed. […]


Beyond Freedom’s Reach: A Kidnapping in the Twilight of Slavery by Adam Rothman

Adam Rothman’s new book Beyond Freedom’s Reach: A Kidnapping in the Twilight of Slavery (Harvard University Press, 2015) brings to light the experiences of enslaved men, women, and children on the eve of and during the Civil War. Rothman follows the case of Louisiana’s enslaved woman Rose Herera and her three young children Joseph Ernest […]


12 Years a Slave and the Problem of Depicting Human Atrocities

The problem of portraying extreme violence is part of scholarly and public debates since the end of the Second World War. After the Holocaust, whereas some scholars considered fiction an adequate means to represent atrocities, other scholars and Holocaust survivors were opposed to these fictional representations, by underscoring the ethical problems posed by it. Theodor […]